Sad Sack at the VA Hospital at Ft Miley, San Francisco

Though I’ve been treated there for years, it was only yesterday that I discovered that WW2 veteran Sad Sack is there too. I must have crossed this 100 times without noticing it.

Sad Sack is an American fictional comic strip and comic book character created by Sgt. George Baker during World War II.

Set in the United States Army, Sad Sack depicted an otherwise unnamed, lowly private experiencing some of the absurdities and humiliations of military life. The title was a euphemistic shortening of the military slang ‘sad sack of shit,’ a common expression during World War II.

Read more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sad_Sack

Originally drawn in pantomime by Baker, The Sad Sack debuted June 1942 as a comic strip in the first issue of Yank, the Army Weekly. It proved popular, and a hardcover collection of Baker’s wartime Sad Sack strips was published by Simon & Schuster, Inc. in 1944, with a follow-up, The New Sad Sack (1946). The original book was concurrently published as an Armed Services edition mass market paperback, in that edition’s standard squarebound, horizontal, 5 5/8″ × 4″ format, by Editions for the Armed Services, Inc., a non-profit organization of The Council on Books in Wartime; it was #719 in the series of Armed Service editions.

After the war ended, The Sad Sack ran in newspaper syndication in the United States until 1957. Baker then sold the rights to Harvey Comics, which produced a large number of commercial spin-offs.

I was actually enjoying this view of the magnificent art deco buildings there when I happened to look down:20160518_125446

 

 

About Stan Flouride

THIS BLOG IS ALWAYS AD-FREE I make stuff and do things.
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One Response to Sad Sack at the VA Hospital at Ft Miley, San Francisco

  1. Gail Wechsler says:

    I’ve heard hundreds of references to Sad Sack and never knew ’til now that it was short for anything. Makes so much more sense.

    Like

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